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Thread: How to salvage Maglite with corroded batteries?

  1. #1

    Default How to salvage Maglite with corroded batteries?

    I dug out an old 4C Maglight and tried to pull the batteries out of it. The first two fell right out, the third took a little persuasion, and the fourth refuses to budge. They were all corroded and swollen.

    Any way I can get that last one out? At this point, I'm ready to chuck the barrel in the trash and keep the rest for spare parts......

  2. #2

    Default Re: How to salvage Maglite with corroded batteries?


    How many years have the batteries been in place?

    What brand were the batteries?

    Unscrew the head assembly, unscrew the lightbulb holder. Without the bulb in the barrel bang the living hell out of it.

    Walk up to a distasteful foe, test the aircraft aluminum on his forehead. If the barrel "dents at all" after impact then trash the light.

    hehehehe

  3. #3
    *Retired* The_LED_Museum's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to salvage Maglite with corroded batteries?

    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by NiMH:
    Unscrew the head assembly, unscrew the lightbulb holder. Without the bulb in the barrel bang the living hell out of it.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I did that once and the whole bulb receptacle assembly fractured, rendering the flashlight useless.

    If the whole switch and bulb assembly can be removed without damage(leaving the barrel open at both ends), a suitable instrument (broomstick or mop handle?) can be jammed in there to dislodge the offending battery.
    You'll probably have to clean the barrel out with hot water, detergent, and a wire brush to remove the corrosive glorp left behind by the decomposed battery.

    http://ledmuseum.home.att.net

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  4. #4
    Administrator Size15's's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to salvage Maglite with corroded batteries?

    Maybe it's that the Lithium battery flashlights such as SureFire are so much better that they get far more use.

    It could also be said that Lithium batterys don't last as long so you need to replace them more often...

    If DL123As have a storage life of 5-10 years, then I'd expect them not to leak or degrade during that time.

    Lithium AAs are almost as expensive as DL123As in England. I'm gonna get four for my StealthLite and compare it to Alk AAs in my other StealthLite.

    I'm sure to post with my results in the near future (I bet you alll can't wait! )

  5. #5
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    Default Re: How to salvage Maglite with corroded batteries?

    Personally before giving up, I'd first try pouring a can of Coke Classic in and let it set for....oh a half-hour. The REAL THING has a way of eating through corrosion(its great on battery terminals). My next trick would be spraying some WD-40 and once again letting it sit. Last but not least a mixture of water and baking soda poured in.
    Hmmmmmm better living through chemicals.

  6. #6
    Flashaholic* DavidW's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to salvage Maglite with corroded batteries?

    If it's a new version (small serial numbers) you can pop the rubber switch cover off to reveal the allen wrench slot. Just give that rubber cover a good pinch. Loosen the allen nut and the switch assembly should pop out. If you have an older Maglite (larger serial numbers) you need a spanner. At which point I'd be thinking it's more trouble than it's worth.

    ------------------
    "A knifeless man is a lifeless man"
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  7. #7
    Flashaholic*
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    Default Re: How to salvage Maglite with corroded batteries?

    I have a new Mag 3D, but it doesn't have a small serial #! I guess you need to define "small" !

    Doug

    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by DavidW:
    If it's a new version (small serial numbers) you can pop the rubber switch cover off to reveal the allen wrench slot. Just give that rubber cover a good pinch. Loosen the allen nut and the switch assembly should pop out. If you have an older Maglite (larger serial numbers) you need a spanner. At which point I'd be thinking it's more trouble than it's worth.

    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


  8. #8

    Default Re: How to salvage Maglite with corroded batteries?

    It's an old one. I used a small punch to loosen the "nut" and managed to get the switch out. Of course the switch came outin 5 pieces, but it came out.

    I then used a 1 inch piece of bar stock inserted into the switch end to HAMMER the battery out. I mean, this thing was swole up like a tick (gratuitous Texan lingo) and wasn't letting go!

    Anyway, it's all back together but the switch doesn't work so now I have to open it back up and try to fix. All that to say that I don't trust it enough to put in the wife's car for emergency use. Too much bad voodoo with this light. I'm gonna fix it and keep it around the house for utility use. The wife's car will get a new one.

    Oh and BTW,

    Check your alkaline batteries regularly!!!

    I thought that the days of my youth when batteries would bust open and screw up your stuff were over. Apparently, they are not. Lithiums have spoiled me and made me complacent. Don't let that happen to you!

    <FONT COLOR="#000000" SIZE="1" FACE="Verdana, Arial">This message has been edited by Greggles on 01-15-2001 at 06:14 PM</font>

  9. #9

    Default Re: How to salvage Maglite with corroded batteries?

    The batteries were 4 year old Duracells. The light was in a closet for the last few years because my Surefires have proven to be much more useful. I was getting this thing back out to put in the wife's car. So much for that idea.

    Prior to removing the batteries, they put out about 50% of the normal output.

    I stripped it down as much as I could and then beat the but of it against a 2x4 on the garage floor. No go. This last battery is lodged pretty good. I may just take this as a learning experience and chuck the thing in the garbage. It's not worth $20 worth of hassle.

    I hate alkaline batteries. Sure it's my fault for forgetting to change them, but my lithiums have never done this.....

  10. #10

    Default Re: How to salvage Maglite with corroded batteries?

    You could try this, get a wooden dowel rod, and a double ended lag bolt. It has threads on both ends and the hex part is in the middle, drill pilot hole in dowel, twist in. Then tap it through the bottom of the battery and twist in until you get a good grip on the battery. Then pull out.

    Probably use a pretty good sized bolt 3/8 " maybe.

    DaveH

  11. #11

    Default Re: How to salvage Maglite with corroded batteries?

    Next time, why don't you just send the whole flashlight to Duracell and they will send you a new one? I sent them a $250 cassette recorder wrecked by leaking batteries and they actually bought me an equivelent machine. I thought everybody knew about their warranty policy. Pretty nice of them!
    Chet

  12. #12
    Flashaholic* Unicorn's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to salvage Maglite with corroded batteries?

    For a flashlight that is to be used for emergencies only, wny not get another lithium light? A Streamlight Scorpion, or a Surefire 6P or 9P would seem a better choice for a light that would sit around most of the time, and still work when needed. No worry about the batteries having died and leaked.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: How to salvage Maglite with corroded batteries?

    Exactly why we have lithium cells!- seldom used, well constructed cells, and 10 yr. shelf life (they still have 90% after 10 years!)

    I did a comparison in lithium (L91BP - the new E2 lithium is the same cell) - versus alkaline in pagers - it costs less to use lithiums because while they cost slightly more, they last a substantially longer time - thus an overall cost savings. Not to mention labor cost in changing cells all the time.

    I also run E2 (L91BP) lithium in my photoflash - they have a high current capability and recharge the speedlight faster - which makes for more rapid photogrpahy. I use a digital camera with a frame buffer, so I can shoot while the camera stores prior images, making battery selection the limiting factor in speed (not the storage speed of the memory card)

    The L91 (E2 lithium) has a Voc of 1.73V versus 1.56V for alkaline (new, current issue cells) - This extra makes the infinity LED light have a bit of a boost, which is another good use for lithiums.

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